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Gibraltar, Spain - 750

A well developed Jewish infrastructure, including four synagogues, a mikvah, and a kosher coffee house

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Botswana, Africa - 100

In 2004, they organized an official Jewish community. Services are held in individual’s homes, and they import kosher foods on a regular basis

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Birobidzhan, Siberia - 5000

The New York Times once called this location “The Jewish Disneyland”. Established in 1928, naming Yiddish as it’s official language. The main avenue is still named ‘Sholem Aleichem Street’ to this day

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Uruguay, South America - 20,000

Rumored to have started forming in the 1600’s. In the 1960’s this community boasted 50,000 members, one of the largest in the world at the time

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Gibraltar, Spain - 750

A well developed Jewish infrastructure, including four synagogues, a mikvah, and a kosher coffee house

Close
Red Village, Azerbaijan - 4000

In the midst of a Shiite Muslim nation lies this thriving population. In 1730 a local king permitted Jews to purchase land known as ‘The Red Village’. The entire city focuses their lives on the sanctity of Shabbat, and closes down accordingly to allow worship.

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Lquitos, Peru - 70

Living near the Amazon, many Jews worked to find their success in the rubber trade back in the 1880’s. In 1948, nearly all the population immigrated back to Israel, and roughly 70 Jews live there today.

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Christchurch, New Zealand - 650

The original settlers arrived here in 1860, and was lead by Louis Edward Nathan. In 1864, he acquired a grant of 300 pounds to build a synagogue. He opted to name it the “Canterbury Hebrew Congregation” as he did not feel like it was appropriate to have ‘Christchurch’ in the name.

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Glasgow, Scotland - 5500

According to the oldest historical evidence, it is said that Jews were present in the late 17th century. The majority are Ashkenazi who settled in Edinburgh, and eventually moved to Glasgow

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Dublin, Ireland - 1500

The population here was determined to be a result of young Jewish professionals working with high tech U.S. companies.

Destinations

Explore by Country

Close
Gibraltar, Spain - 750

A well developed Jewish infrastructure, including four synagogues, a mikvah, and a kosher coffee house

Close
Botswana, Africa - 100

In 2004, they organized an official Jewish community. Services are held in individual’s homes, and they import kosher foods on a regular basis

Close
Birobidzhan, Siberia - 5000

The New York Times once called this location “The Jewish Disneyland”. Established in 1928, naming Yiddish as it’s official language. The main avenue is still named ‘Sholem Aleichem Street’ to this day

Close
Uruguay, South America - 20,000

Rumored to have started forming in the 1600’s. In the 1960’s this community boasted 50,000 members, one of the largest in the world at the time

Close
Gibraltar, Spain - 750

A well developed Jewish infrastructure, including four synagogues, a mikvah, and a kosher coffee house

Close
Red Village, Azerbaijan - 4000

In the midst of a Shiite Muslim nation lies this thriving population. In 1730 a local king permitted Jews to purchase land known as ‘The Red Village’. The entire city focuses their lives on the sanctity of Shabbat, and closes down accordingly to allow worship.

Close
Lquitos, Peru - 70

Living near the Amazon, many Jews worked to find their success in the rubber trade back in the 1880’s. In 1948, nearly all the population immigrated back to Israel, and roughly 70 Jews live there today.

Close
Christchurch, New Zealand - 650

The original settlers arrived here in 1860, and was lead by Louis Edward Nathan. In 1864, he acquired a grant of 300 pounds to build a synagogue. He opted to name it the “Canterbury Hebrew Congregation” as he did not feel like it was appropriate to have ‘Christchurch’ in the name.

Close
Glasgow, Scotland - 5500

According to the oldest historical evidence, it is said that Jews were present in the late 17th century. The majority are Ashkenazi who settled in Edinburgh, and eventually moved to Glasgow

Close
Dublin, Ireland - 1500

The population here was determined to be a result of young Jewish professionals working with high tech U.S. companies.

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